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No Crack Allowed

November 30, 2009

From my family vacation in Arizona….I consider….

Who do you surround yourself with?

Have you ever been friends with someone who downloads free software and entertainment and thinks that it is OK because they know how to do it without getting caught? When you make concessions to things that in your heart you know is stealing for economic gain then you are selling out your own honesty and integrity, robbing yourself of any principles in which to stand for. You are also robbing companies of their ability to earn money to continue to hire people to continue Research and Development for improving their product and paying their employees. You are ruining our economy, and you are hurting all of us in the long run. When you share illegally your music and movies, you are taking away the future incentives of the artists and investors to continue to bring you the very things you refuse to pay for. Musicians have to work twice as hard as ever because their profits from song sales are diminished so greatly, that they rely on constant touring and selling merchandise during the concerts. Metallica has been very active in stopping illegal music downloads. ‘Anger’ leads Metallica to the Internet


As posted on his YouTube site DanielHall1993

Song by heavy metal band Metallica as part of the ‘Mission Impossible II (2)’ album/sound track. The discovery of the song in early 2000 on the P2P file-sharing network Napster helped bring the illegal sharing of mp3 files to the spotlight, leading to the massive lawsuits that eventually brought down the original incarnation of Napster.

The music video to the song, directed by Wayne Isham, features the members from Metallica in scenes that reference other movies. James Hetfield is driving a car down a San Franciscan hill, in a chase sequence resembling Bullitt, Kirk Hammett is on a desert being chased by a plane (North by Northwest), Jason Newsted is in a mansion struggling against hundreds of people that walk by him (Brazil), and Lars Ulrich jumps off a building (Die Hard). The car driven by James in the video is a 1967 Chevrolet Camaro. Upon the video’s completion, the car was given to Hetfield as a gift. It was later auctioned off on eBay by James himself for charity.

Lyrics:

Hey, hey, hey.
Here I go now, here I go into new days.
Hey, hey, hey.
Here I go now, here I go into new days.

I’m pain, I’m hope, I’m suffer.
Yeah, hey, hey, hey, yeah, yeah.
Here I go into new days.

Hey, hey, hey.
Ain’t no mercy, ain’t no mercy there for me.
Hey, hey, hey.
Ain’t no mercy, ain’t no mercy there for me.

I’m pain, I’m hope, I’m suffer.
Yeah, hey, hey, hey.
Ain’t no mercy, ain’t no mercy there for me.

Do you bury me when I’m gone?
Do you teach me while I’m here.
Just as soon as I belong.
Then it’s time I disappear.

Hey, hey, hey.
And I went, and I went on down that road.
Hey, hey, hey.
And I went on, and I went on down that road.

I’m pain, I’m hope, I’m suffer.
Hey, hey, hey.
Yeah and went on, and I went on down that road.

Do you bury me when I’m gone?
Do you teach me while I’m here?
Just as soon as I belong.
Then it’s time I disappear.

Do you bury me when I’m gone.
Do you teach me while I’m here.
Just as soon as I belong.
Then it’s time I disappear.

Just like that.
I’m gone, I’m gone, I’m gone, oh baby, I’m gone.
I’m gone, I’m gone, baby.
I’m gone, I’m gone.

Do you bury me when I’m gone?
Do you teach me while I’m here?
Just as soon as I belong.
Then it’s time I disappear.

Do you bury me when I’m gone?
Do you teach me while I’m here?
Just as soon as I belong.
Then it’s time I disappear, yeah.

Go To Wikipedia for Full Metallica coverage

Napster controversy (2000–2001)

In 2000, Metallica discovered that a demo of its song “I Disappear“, which was supposed to be released in combination with the Mission: Impossible II soundtrack, was receiving radio airplay. Tracing the source of the leak, the band found the file on the Napster peer-to-peer file-sharing network, and also found that the band’s entire catalogue was freely available.[41] Legal action was initiated against Napster with Metallica filing a lawsuit at the U.S. District Court, Central District of California, alleging that Napster violated three areas of the law: copyright infringement, unlawful use of digital audio interface device, and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.[25][42]

Ulrich led the case against Napster

Though the lawsuit named three universities for copyright infringement, the University of Southern California, Yale University, and Indiana University, no individuals were named. Yale and Indiana complied and blocked the service from its campuses, and Metallica withdrew the universities’ inclusion in the lawsuit.[43] Southern California, however, had a meeting with students to figure out what was going to happen with Napster. School administrators wanted it banned as its usage accounted for 40% of the bandwidth not being used for educational purposes.[44]

Metallica hired online consulting firm NetPD to monitor the Napster service for a weekend. A list of 335,435 Napster users who were believed to be sharing Metallica’s music was compiled, and the 60,000 page document was delivered to Napster’s office as Metallica requested the users be banned from the service.[45] The users were banned, and rap artist Dr. Dre joined the lawsuit against Napster, which resulted in an additional 230,142 Napster users banned.[46]

Ulrich provided a statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee regarding copyright infringement on July 11, 2000.[41] Federal Judge Marilyn Hall Patel ordered the site place a filter on the program in 72 hours or be shut down.[47] A settlement was reached between Metallica and Napster when German media conglomerate Bertelsmann AG BMG showed interest to purchase the rights to Napster for $94 million. Under the terms of settlement, Napster agreed to block users who shared music by artists who do not want their music shared.[48] However, on June 3, 2002 Napster filed for Chapter 11 protection under U.S. bankruptcy laws. On September 3, 2002, an American bankruptcy judge blocked the sale to Bertelsmann and forced Napster to liquidate its assets according to Chapter 7 of the U.S. bankruptcy laws.[49]

At the 2000 MTV Video Music Awards, Ulrich appeared in a skit with host Marlon Wayans that blasted the idea of using Napster to share music. Marlon played a college student sitting in his dorm room listening to Metallica’s “I Disappear”. Ulrich walked in and asked for an explanation. On receiving Wayans’ excuse that using Napster was just “sharing”, Lars retorted that Marlon’s idea of sharing was “borrowing things that were not yours without asking.” He called in the Metallica road crew, who proceeded to confiscate all of Wayans’ belongings, leaving him almost nude in an empty room. Napster creator Shawn Fanning responded later in the ceremony by presenting an award wearing a Metallica shirt, saying, “I borrowed this shirt from a friend. Maybe, if I like it, I’ll buy one of my own.”[50]

Even though I am on unemployment right now, and I know plenty of people who own Microsoft Office and could have asked them to loan me their CD and product key, I made a conscious choice to purchase the software when my trial time expired.

I’ve known companies that cut corners every chance they can to use crack codes instead of purchasing programs that is standard software needed in their line of business. When I am hired for my next job, if I ever saw someone doing that on my job site I will quit. Think about it, a company who would steal from other companies not only is predisposed to cheat them, but you too.

What is a Crack Program?

Digital Economy Bill: crackdown on illegal filesharers confirmed

File Sharing

File Sharing Discussion on Serj Tankian Website

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