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Efficient Cause

November 27, 2009

Another interesting scenario….

I was taught this year that when people come into your space it is because they want something from you.

I had another person appear out of nowhere…and when I asked, “Why?” The answer was….”Efficient Cause.”

Gino Angelo Castiglione

Dictionary Reference for Efficient Cause
 

  –noun

 
1. a person or thing that acts, happens, or exists in such a way that some specific thing happens as a result; the producer of an effect: You have been the cause of much anxiety. What was the cause of the accident?

 

 

 

           2. the reason or motive for some human action: The good news was a cause for rejoicing.

 

           3. good or sufficient reason: to complain without cause; to be dismissed for cause.

   

 Law.

 

            a. a ground of legal action; the matter over which a person goes to law.

 

           b. a case for judicial decision.

 

           5. any subject of discussion or debate.

 

           6. a principle, ideal, goal, or movement to which a person or group is dedicated: the Socialist cause; the human rights cause.

 

           7. the welfare of a person or group, seen as a subject of concern: support for the cause of the American Indian.

 

         Philosophy.

 

           a. the end or purpose for which a thing is done or produced.

 

           b

 

 Aristotelianism. any of the four things necessary for the movement or the coming into being of a thing, namely a material (material cause), something to act upon it (efficient cause), a form taken by the movement or development (formal cause), and a goal or purpose (final cause).

–verb (used with object)

 

 

 

 9.

 

 

 to be the cause of; bring about.

—Idiom

 

 

 

 10.

 

 

 make common cause, to unite in a joint effort; work together for the same end: They made common cause with neighboring countries and succeeded in reducing tariffs.


Origin:
1175–1225; ME < L causa reason, sake, case

Related forms:

caus⋅a⋅ble, adjective
caus⋅a⋅bil⋅i⋅ty, noun
causeless, adjective
cause⋅less⋅ly, adverb
cause⋅less⋅ness, noun
causer, noun
Synonyms:
1. Cause, occasion refer to the starting of effects into motion. A cause is an agency, perhaps acting through a long time, or a long-standing situation, that produces an effect: The cause of the quarrel between the two men was jealousy. An occasion is an event that provides an opportunity for the effect to become evident, or perhaps promotes its becoming evident: The occasion was the fact that one man’s wages were increased. 3. See reason. 9. effect, make, create, produce.
Legal Dictionary

Main Entry: cause
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Forms: caused; caus·ing
1 : to serve as the cause of causing injuries for which she sues —Palsgraf v. Long Island Railroad Company, 162 N.E.99 (1928)>
2 : to effect by command, authority, or force cause an investigation to be made

Word Origin & History

cause  (n.)

c.1225, from L. causa “a cause, reason, judicial process, lawsuit,” of unknown origin. Cause célèbre “celebrated legal case” is 1763, from Fr.
Synonyms:
1. Cause, occasion refer to the starting of effects into motion. A cause is an agency, perhaps acting through a long time, or a long-standing situation, that produces an effect: The cause of the quarrel between the two men was jealousy. An occasion is an event that provides an opportunity for the effect to become evident, or perhaps promotes its becoming evident: The occasion was the fact that one man’s wages were increased. 3. See reason. 9. effect, make, create, produce.
I can’t help but feel suspicious of the different types of people coming to my blog lately. The search terms on my Dashboard show terms such as “Hacker”. This person deny’s that, so I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt until further evidence is collected.  I would like his permission though to post his e-mails to me. Please send me that in writing to my private email account and I will continue this dialogue.
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